Category Archives: Ideas & Resources

BVD Tour—The Third Week

BVD—Barbara Seppeler, Val Medve and Dan Seppeler, accompanied by Tom Medve (and in part, Tom Grande)—toured New England last month. Val and Barb shared the daily diary writing; see their earlier blogs, Intro, The First Week, The Second Week.

Barb’s post from the pianist’s point of view!, Tuesday, July 16

bvd at nelson town hall_cropped

Barb, Val and Dan at the Nelson (NH) Town Hall

No dance tonight, but I was busy reviewing my notes from Jacqueline Schwab’s English Country Dance Musicians’ Course at Pinewoods 2010 and 2011 (sponsored by CDSS). Both years, on the seven hour ride home, I sat in the passenger’s seat, listening to CDs by Bare Necessities as I wrote down everything Jacqueline had tried to teach us. During the interim years, I also took notes on my learning process, so that I’d be prepared to teach an ECD Musicians’ Workshop, should the opportunity arise. Well, ready or not, it was to be today—at Tom and Val’s house near Burlington, VT!

It was exhilarating, to say the least, to share my hard-won knowledge with two very receptive, musical and simply delightful people from northern Vermont. These musicians are as in love with ECD as I am. The ninety minutes were quickly over, and I am so hopeful that my insights were useful. [Val’s note: Before the workshop, Dan caught up on sleep with a nap; I picked up our CSA share and then cobbled together a simple supper. We held the workshop in our air-conditioned dining room (due to the 90 degree heat outside, even at 6 pm.]

Barb’s post from the pianist’s point of view!, Wednesday, July 17

No dance or class! We are all in a state of collapse… but we are going to St. Michael’s Playhouse tonight to see Neil Simon’s Rumors, and what fun that turned out to be. I love to see plays and musicals, but hardly ever get to see anything professional, so this was really a special treat for me. [Val’s note: Having some free time during the day was a very welcome respite from our hectic schedule. Tom mowed the lawn as others napped. Supper was at a local Italian restaurant, for which I had a coupon — and the leftovers served as our lunch the next day. Today and the next day, Dan and I spent some time programming the final round of dance gigs.]

Barb’s post from the pianist’s point of view!, Thursday, July 18

dan calls dance

Dan calls a dance at the beginner-friendly English dance party in Richmond, VT (Tom Medve)

Back to work at English country dancing today and very happy about it!! Val and Dan called the dance for the beginner-friendly ECD series in Richmond, VT. I played the grand piano there, which is a really beautiful Steinway with a touch that is not too stiff. (I do work harder when I play there, but by the end of the night I am used to it!) [Val’s note: Our Richmond series has been happening for several years. It’s an inexpensive way for new dancers to try ECD, since we ask for a very small voluntary donation and usually have recorded music. This evening, our regular dancers from Montpelier arrived in TWO carloads, bringing one or two new dancers with them. It’s a joy to have such dedicated dancers in our community! Today’s highlight for my husband Tom? Sharing two micro-brewed beers with Dan when we got home!]

Barb’s post from the pianist’s point of view!, Friday, July 19

We’re back on the road, this time to Nelson, NH! We’re very excited about this gig! This Monadnock region has a very active contra community, and a relatively new ECD series, so we were all so happy to bring our new dances—and especially our support!

hunt and allison

Impromptu post-breakfast concert by Hunt Smith and Allison Aldrich in their NH home (Tom Medve)

Before the dance, Allison Aldrich and Hunt Smith provided us with a tasty supper at their home. We were amazed and intrigued by Allison and Hunt. Hunt built their lovely home. It looks like a cabin, with all natural wood, and a kitchen with the pots hanging from the ceiling. Hunt’s exquisite artwork hung on the walls. He is a maritime artist and his work is astounding in its detail and beauty.

In a small hallway off the kitchen, I noticed an odd shelf of multiple heights. On closer inspection, I realized that the “shelves” were old wooden organ pipes! This discovery led to Hunt inviting us to visit his workshop, where he creates hand-made violins from blocks of wood. He handed me a violin-shaped form, and said, “Whatever you do, don’t drop this!” It was unexpectedly heavy, as it contained the outside of a violin plus a form on the inside…and no, I did not drop it. [Val’s note: And Bob Dalsemer—from John C. Campbell Folk School and the 2011 CDSS Lifetime Contribution Award—will be happy to hear that, since this was the violin he commissioned Hunt to make!]

grp shot at nelson

Group photo at the Nelson (NH) English country dance (Tom Medve)

The Nelson Town Hall was our dance venue. It’s a quaint and interesting space. It seemed that we stepped back in time at least one hundred years. They said they could fit five (very cozy) contra lines in there, and there was a small stage, as well. I opted for my electric piano, instead of the on-site grand, as my smaller keyboard packs a nice sound, plus I can be closer to the dancers.

I was told I need to smile more, which I am sure is true. But in my defense, I was playing ECD solo, and for me that takes a ton of concentration! (No one can bail me out if I make a mistake!!) I am lucky to give callers a tight-lipped nod when they give me the number of times to play before ending, so usually I smile when it is done…like whew!! I will work on smiling more!!!! :-)

Dance highlights included Dan’s wonderful dance, Lambs on Green Hill, which he choreographed and also composed the B music. (The A section is a traditional Scottish tune called Ned of the Hill.)

At the end of the dance, Dan and I met Ramona and Jerry, our hosts for the evening. (Val and Tom stayed with Hunt and Allison). Ramona and Jerry were gracious hosts, chatting the late evening away with us. Their home was so pretty, and the air-conditioning was such a welcome relief from the heat of the dance. In the morning, we had a quick breakfast and after touring their luscious July gardens, we helped them with their ECD skills. Dan never misses an opportunity to teach dancers, so it was quite an effort to get him to stop…as Val and Tom were waiting for us!! But it was all fun!

Val’s post, Friday, July 19

dan & barb2

Barb and Dan Seppeler onstage at the Nelson dance (Val Medve)

It had been decades since I attended a contra dance in the Nelson Town Hall. Most likely it was in the early to mid-1980s when I had gotten “the contra bug” and traveled all over New England to dance. Since that time, quite a few wonderful improvements have been made to the hall. Lisa Sieverts, who calls contras at the hall and is one of several people instrumental in the contra series’ organization, told us about the renovations (which I believe are continuing). It’s a very sweet space in which to dance, call and play. We had a small but earnest and enthusiastic turnout. I later learned that this Monadnock ECD series draws dancers from some distance—but since our BVD Tour was visiting those other dance communities, it may have impacted attendance that night in Nelson. Another factor was the hot and humid weather (high 90s during the day, I recall). Allison Aldrich promised—via Facebook postings—that the temperature would drop dramatically in the evening, to make for very pleasant dancing. In reality, global warming visited Nelson on July 19th: the temp did drop, but not as low as Allison predicted (per her past experience). Luckily, the many window fans helped cool the venue a bit.

Because the ECD series in the Monadnock region was recently established, we expected mostly dancers new to the genre. However, with one or two exceptions, the majority of the dancers were experienced English dancers. We were thrilled to see Mary Jones on the dance floor. She had come to Nelson on an errand for CDSS and then decided to stay for the dance since the evening was so lightly attended. This was very kind of her—and much appreciated by our BVD group.

ladies that made

Lisa Sieverts and Allison Smith, who made the English dance happen, with support from the Monadnock Folklore Society (Val Medve)

Parts of my program quickly flew out the window when I recognized so many dancers and gauged the overall skill level. The simple Geud Man of Ballingigh was replaced by my BVD Tour fave, Colin Hume’s much more challenging Sting in the Tail, since the numbers (six couples) were just right for that dance. Once again, our solo pianist Barb rolled with the punches and quickly found the tunes for this and other alternate dances.

Allison and Lisa organized (and contributed to) the refreshments at the break. There were delicious treats—and the refreshing mint iced tea was my go-to beverage to quench my thirst. Overall, it was a very enjoyable evening. We may have ended a bit early, due to the heat, however.

Val’s post, Saturday, July 20

Tom and I had a good night’s sleep at Allison and Hunt’s house. It certainly helped to go to bed at a very reasonable hour (11 pm—early for us on this tour, late for Allison and Hunt). We enjoyed Allison’s excellent homemade granola for breakfast, along with cups of tea. We were treated to a delightful morning concert, with Allison and Hunt practicing the New England tunes they would play later that morning at the Brattleboro Farmers’ Market. Before the concert, we listened to the two long-time performing musicians talk about how to draw and engage your audience—approaches that also work for dance callers and dance musicians. Lots of great information that I wish we had recorded or captured on video. Perhaps this could be a future video project undertaken by CDSS?

dancers await

Dancers await instructions for an English country dance, Champlain Valley Folk Festival, Burlington, VT (Tom Medve)

We drove directly from Nelson, NH to Burlington, VT for the Champlain Valley Folk Festival. Our ECD session was scheduled for 6:30 pm, following on the heels of singing Happy Birthday to the Festival, on the occasion of its 30th year—with everyone dining on a decorated sheet cake.

The muggy weather had finally broken, so we had clear skies above the Dance Tent and welcome breezes wafting through it. Due to financial difficulties, the Festival was cancelled in 2012. It was resurrected in 2013 on an earlier-than-usual weekend in a new venue, the Rock Point School (a scenic spot, nestled between North Beach and Burlington High School). The 2013 festival had been scaled down and many performers (including ALL the callers and musicians who performed in the Dance Tent) donated their services for free so that the Festival could earn some money to ensure future festivals.

Barb’s post from the pianist’s point of view!

frost & fire

Frost and Fire plays for a contra dance, Champlain Valley Folk Festival, Burlington, VT: (l-r) Hollis Easter, Peter Macfarland, Viveka Fox and Aaron Marcus (Tom Medve)

It’s time to go to the Champlain Valley Folk Festival. I had never been to a folk festival before, so this promised to be a lot of fun, and it was! We walked to the dance tent and immediately joined the contra lines. We couldn’t help it, the music (by Frost and Fire) and calling (by Will Mentor) were so great! But after two dances, our clothes got soaked from the humidity. Knowing that we were to perform soon, we were forced to stop, at least for a bit. I was astonished to watch Frost and Fire’s Aaron Marcus play piano for contra AND supply foot percussion! I have never seen a pianist do anything like this, and he was incredible! I want to learn!!

I was introduced to the musicians who were to be my bandmates later that afternoon. Peter Macfarlane and Hollis Easter from Frost and Fire and Joanne Garton from The Turning Stile.

Right before we were to perform, Dan and I noticed a dancer in the contra line. He was one of our dancers from the Hobart/William Smith English Dancers in Geneva, NY. (This is the ECD club that Dan and I started, teaching and playing every Friday during the academic year.) We were flabbergasted when Ryan motioned to Eileen, another of the Hobart dancers, who immediately ran over to hug us! What a greeting!

Our performance was well-received, with a very long line of dancers who appeared to immensely enjoy themselves!

cake

Let them eat cake, Champlain Valley Folk Festival, Burlington, VT (Tom Medve)

Every night we have maintained our debriefing meetings to determine how to improve ourselves. Our Massachusetts gigs in Whately (Monday) and West Newton (Wednesday) are bearing down on us, and we need to be at our absolute best for these dances. But first comes tomorrow’s ECD Musicians’ Workshop and English country dance in Norwich, Vermont. To be continued…

Singing and Dancing in Macedonia

by David Millstone

Rehearsal in Monastery of Virgin Mary 6

Rehearsing songs in a historic church near Struga, southern Macedonia; photo by fellow camper Sophia Emigh

I’ve been a contra dancer for some 40 years and an English country dance enthusiast since 1987. For decades, the only singing I did was with my fifth grade students, who didn’t understand that I couldn’t really sing. With that background, what took me on a overseas trip with Village Harmony for two weeks of singing and dancing, Macedonian style?

It started when I told my wife, Sheila, who has spent years coming along with me to dance weekends and camps, that it was time that I accompanied her instead of vice versa. (“He makes it sound like that was a punishment I endured,” she quickly adds. “I love to dance.”) This was the trip she picked. “It’s okay,” I said. “I can just spend my time documenting the trip with photos and videos.” This was met by a steely gaze that quickly translated into “You Will Sing.”

So, there I am in southern Macedonia, a self-identified non-singer with little experience in folk dance, and after the first few days I’m ready to hide under the covers. It’s a Slavic language, many songs are based on an oriental scale with elaborate vocal ornamentation, and then there are those odd meters: 7/8, 9/8, and more. My hands can clap the rhythms, but not always connected to the tunes.

This is just the singing; let’s not discuss in detail my feet. Unlike country dancing, stepping one beat at a time and learning a series of different figures, these dances all come in the same simple formation but with unfamiliar demands on my body—slow steps and quick steps, weight shifts, hops and pivots, downbeats with an uplifted foot. “The music tells you what to do,” right? If so, this music was telling me, “Get out of the way of people who know what they’re doing.”

For there were many around me having no trouble. There were strong singers, accustomed to learning by ear and holding down a part. Some had come to Balkan camps before, some sing and dance Balkan in their home communities, some even speak Serbo-Croatian or Macedonian. Although I’m a totally competent country dancer, I was definitely Out of My League on this dance floor.

This tale of woe has a happy ending—I had a great time. A lot of that was thanks to my fellow campers. “I don’t sing,” I mentioned to a tenor near me early on. “What do you mean?” he said. “Everyone sings.” He wasn’t making a political statement, just presenting this as a fact. Lesson learned: stop making excuses, listen, and open your mouth. I discovered, too, that I wasn’t alone. Their solution? Give it a try, and so I did. Can’t sing this particular tenor line? Okay, I’ll stick with the bass part here… it’s simpler. Not sure how this section goes? Turned out I wasn’t the only one, as one of our leaders drilled the group on the same four bars of music until we all had it.

Same thing with the dancing. I practiced by myself behind the line, got coaching on the side from those who knew what to do, and gradually felt more comfortable. (Yes, dancing in 12/8 is still awkward.) Some of it was letting go of the notion that I had to be able to do everything well. Sometimes I stumbled around in line, doing fragments of a dance and gradually adding other pieces. No one pulled me out for remedial lessons, no one frowned; folks on either side trusted that I’d ask for help if needed. When we gave our final concerts, singing and dancing in small villages, the locals offered no critical judgments—they joined our chorus on many well-known songs, grinned at our pronunciation, reached out a hand and made space in line with a smile.

In a few days, it’ll be time to join the community chorus at Harmony of Song & Dance, CDSS’s next program at Pinewoods. I can’t wait. I get to sing again!

In addition to being a contra and English country dancer, caller, dance historian, videographer, co-author (Cracking Chestnuts), coordinator of the Square Dance History Project), and new international dancer and singer, David Millstone currently serves as CDSS’s President.

“Rootbound”

by Nathaniel Smith

maplemorris1_t_by sarah pilzer

Maple Morris; photo by Sarah Pilzer

Maple Morris & Morris Offspring present Rootbound:
Celebrating the life of English folk dance in North America

with music by Ian Robb, Amelia Mason, Eric McDonald and Emily Troll
original lyrics by Susan Cooper

July 15, The Armory Performance Hall, 191 Highland Ave, Somerville, MA
July 19, The Berkeley Church, 315 Queen St E., Toronto, Canada

 

 

 

Rootbound_thumbMaple Morris (North America) and Morris Offspring (United Kingdom) are thrilled to invite you to their collaborative theatrical Morris dance production, Rootbound. A blend of vigorous dancing, musical exploration, vibrant costumes, and creative storytelling, Rootbound will tell the story of a dancer’s journey in the North American Morris dance community.

Morris is a surviving English traditional folk dance that has been performed since the 1400s and has been associated with seasonal and harvest rituals. The dance is vigorous and athletic and the high leaps are accented by the use of white handkerchiefs and bells. Laurel Swift of Morris Offspring describes Morris dancing as “a complex and energetic art form demanding athleticism, coordination, and musicality from its performers, expected to display both discipline and individuality at any moment. It is rich in material, forms and movement, rarely tapped by the wider arts world yet offering a unique source of artistic possibilities.”

Maple Morris is a community of young dancers from across North America who are dedicated to promoting creativity, leadership, and continued excellence in future generations of the North American Morris Revival. In 2011, Maple traveled to the UK to collaborate with England’s foremost innovators, Morris Offspring. The result was the production Must Come Down, a stage performance showcasing Morris dancing at its most inventive.

offspring_photo1_t_by alan cole

Morris Offspring; photo by Alan Cole

The return leg of this collaboration this summer will see Maple Morris joined by Morris Offspring in a brand new stage production in Boston and Toronto. Rootbound will feature music by the powerful singer Ian Robb (of the folk trio Finest Kind: www.ianrobb.com), Amelia Mason, Eric McDonald, and Emily Troll, words from acclaimed author Susan Cooper, and new Morris dance creations by Maple Morris and Morris Offspring.

Beer and wine will be available at both performances. Premium ($40) and general admission ($25) tickets are available at maplemorris.com/rootbound/.

For more information, visit our website: www.maplemorris.com

Rootbound is supported in part by the Country Dance and Song Society’s Outreach Funds.

Addendum: See the Boston Globe 7/11/13 online article about the event, http://www.bostonglobe.com/arts/theater-art/2013/07/11/review-rootbound-maple-morris-and-morris-offspring/AVgLw9uZKjyldbKakqJeUI/story.html.

 

The Rose and the Thorn: Contrasts in Music and Dance of Earlier Times

photo by Paul Lipke

Early Music Week
Pinewoods Camp, Plymouth, MA
June 27-July 4, 2013

Watch a video of the week.
Read or print the flyer.

Free or measured? Monophonic or polyphonic? Improvised or written? Medieval or Renaissance? Treble or Contrabass? Dance music or concert music? High pitch or low pitch?

Explore these delicious questions and many more in a friendly, welcoming, magical place, with world-class faculty, friendly participants, and where the sounds of music and dance rise to the tops of the trees. This is CDSS’s Early Music Week, June 27-July 4, 2013, held at Pinewoods Camp, Plymouth, MA.

The week’s program offers musical challenges and opportunities for beginners and experienced players and singers. In morning technique and consort classes and afternoon special topic ensembles, we will play and sing music from the vibrant Middle Ages to the virtuosic Baroque.

Photo by Corey Green

If you’ve never played a musical instrument (but wish you could), or if you studied music years ago (and fear you’ve forgotten everything), there are classes to get you started or to help brush off the rust. Introductory classes are offered this year in recorder, viol and harp. Advanced and intermediate players and singers have a wide array of classes from which to choose: early winds (recorders, reeds and brass), strings (viols and violin), harpsichord and voice.

Dancers, too, will find a wealth of activity, including high-level technique classes, challenging ensembles and historical dance.

Relaxing is always part of the week, too, with two ponds for swimming and canoeing, a Camphouse deck for summer reading, afternoon tea, staff concerts and lots of wonderful dancing-for-all.

Also offered during the Early Music Week are two Special Courses: Viol Intensive Course, with Sarah Mead and Lisa Terry, and English Dance Musicians Course, with Peter Barnes.  (Separate registration is required for each Special Course.)

photo by Cheri Glaser

The week is run by the Country Dance and Song Society, a traditional dance and music organization, founded in 1915, whose work is grounded in English and Anglo-American social dance and dance music. Early Music Week has been part of our summer programs since 1958. Please join us for glorious music and dance under the trees!

Early Music Week
Pinewoods Camp, Plymouth, MA
June 27-July 4, 2013

Camp staff
(click on “week” in the horizontal gray bar to sort by week name)
Class descriptions (printable)

Class schedule
Class schedule (printable)
To register for the week
Fees
Scholarships
(In addition to the CDSS scholarships, summer scholarships are offered by Early Music America, deadline: April 15, and the Viola da Gamba Society of America, deadline: April 15.)

Fundraising for your group or project

by Rima Dael, CDSS Executive Director

We have been getting many requests of how best to fundraise for a project or for a group. I’ve sent the resources below to a few members but I wanted to post this here for everyone to see.

First, let’s set the context in which you are fundraising. Eighty percent of all philanthropic dollars comes from individuals, 5% from corporations and 15% from foundations. But the Arts only receive 4% of all the philanthropic dollars donated. More information on giving statistics is available through Charity Navigator.

Here is a great tool from the Chronicle of Philanthropy to give you an overview of how individuals give in the US based on location: http://philanthropy.com/section/How-America-Gives/621/.

For most groups and specific projects I recommend crowd source fundraising* and small project grants as a good way to build a solid donor base for a project. Individual donors are the best way to build sustainability for your group.

Here is a resource on how to cultivate donors: http://www.fracturedatlas.org/site/blog/2012/09/06/tips-and-tools-cultivating-donors/.

Here is a link with some grants and funding leads: http://foundationcenter.org/focus/arts/.

And another one: http://grantspace.org/Tools/Knowledge-Base/Individual-Grantseekers/Artists/Funding-for-individual-artists.

Here is a link and resource for crowd source fundraising: http://www.azarts.gov/news-resources/news/trends-in-fundraising-crowdfunding-101/.

And another one: http://www.fracturedatlas.org/site/blog/2012/09/26/tips-and-tools-crowdfunding/.

Once that is started and underway, going the more traditional route to build an annual fundraising plan which would include major donors, I suggest this article about individual donors: http://www.fracturedatlas.org/site/blog/2013/02/07/tips-and-tools-individual-appeals/.

I heartedly recommend signing up for a free account through Fractured Atlas, which is a partner to CDSS, for their free fundraising webinar courses; here is a link to those courses: http://courses.fracturedatlas.org/courses.

Happy Fundraising!

Rima :)

* Crowd source funding and fundraising is networking with people via the internet and word of mouth, to pool money together to support a project or organization. In other words, it’s when you invite your supporters to reach out to their contacts and spread the message, raising money on your behalf.

 

“It’s Fun To Hunt”

by David Millstone

photo by Nikki Herbst

Ralph Page gave this title to a regular column in his Northern Junket magazine, in which he shared information he had gleaned from looking through old newspapers in New Hampshire and Vermont. For those of us interested in dance history, he’s absolutely right.

Late last month, CDSS member Karen Mueller-Harder heard a wonderful story on Vermont Public Radio. In it, VPR reporter Steve Zind tells about John Stone, who in 1956 recorded a dance in Newfane, Vermont. Stone recently donated his tape to the Vermont Folklife Center, which digitized the recording. (Dance caller and CDSS youth intern Mary Wesley has worked at the VFC—small world!) Zind’s story describes how listening to the tape brought back a flood of memories for Stone.

Karen sent a link to the story to Steve Howe, at the CDSS office, who shared it with fellow staff members. Pat MacPherson in turn passed on the link to me and to Bob Dalsemer, one of my colleagues on the Square Dance History Project (SDHP). It was, indeed, a lovely and evocative story.

The VPR story included only a few snippets from the actual dance recording—the focus is Stone’s reactions to hearing the music once again—but I was interested in hearing more of the source material. I went to the website of the Vermont Folklife Center and spent a frustrating time trying to locate the original, without success. I turned to Google and easily located VFC’s posted file of the recording, a beautifully preserved digital file. A few minutes later I added a reference to this audio clip of three singing squares (the Dick Perry Orchestra and caller Ira Huntley) to our SDHP website.

But wait! There’s more! I wasn’t familiar with all three dances, and Bob quickly identified one as “Belle of the Ball,” which he knew from the calling of Otto Wood. Otto (fiddle) and his wife Marguerite (piano) hailed from Michigan, but were regulars on staff at Pinewoods and at the John C. Campbell Folk School in Brasstown, NC, as they made their way to and from Florida each winter. Bob’s e-mail included a typescript of Otto’s calls for that dance and an appreciation of the Woods on a website celebrating Michigan fiddlers.

It turned out that Belle of the Ball was just one page from a larger collection of Otto’s dances that had been prepared by storyteller and occasional dance caller Donald Davis, working closely with Marguerite sometime after Otto’s death. (Donald Davis has been a frequent staff member at our CDSS family camp at Ogontz, and he will be on staff again this summer; “Otto and Marguerite” is among his vast repertoire of stories.) After a few more e-mail exchanges we had his permission to post the complete set, so we’ve added Otto’s calls for 17 singing squares and Marguerite’s music to the SDHP website.

All in all, a very enjoyable and productive few days. It’s fun to hunt!

Editor’s note: See more about the Square Dance History Project in earlier blogs: SDHP Update (1/10/13) and SDHP Launches New Website (10/2/12)..

 

 

 

Kicking Off Plans for SW Conference

by Linda Henry, CDSS Outreach Manager

Plans are afoot for creating a leadership conference for the Southwest United States! An email recently went out to all CDSS group affiliates in the SW and others we know are interested. The message invited 80 people to participate in a phone meeting about preliminary plans. If you didn’t receive this initial email and would like to be included, please read on.

The call will happen on 1/19/13 (see below for call-in information). We’ll focus on…

  • describing the exciting potential for this event — building connections and bringing resources to dance groups throughout the Southwest (including contra, square and English country dance);
  • explaining how the planning process will work — a collaborative effort involving a core group of organizers from the SW with ongoing support from CDSS;
  • making connections and gathering input to help the conference happen (event date and location TBD).

As CDSS Outreach Manager, I’ll have the very fulfilling role of supporting the SW planning team to create the conference. Possible supports include grant funding, publicity and logistics — sharing materials generated by organizers of previous conferences. (See Puttin’ On the Dance as one example.)

For starters, I’ll send the planners a template survey along with contact information for SW groups currently in the CDSS database.This poll will make it possible to assess which resources are needed throughout the region in order to help dance communities grow and thrive. Based on these needs, the planners will design the content of the conference. This can include workshops and other resources for callers, musicians, dance organizers, sound engineers and more… plus there will be time for dancing, networking and having fun together!

This first phone meeting will be facilitated by Cora McCold of Durango, CO. With assistance from CDSS and several dance groups in her area, Cora attended the Midwest Leadership Conference in Cincinnati, OH last August. She returned home with enthusiasm for launching plans for an event in the SW.

If you’d like to join this call — or know anyone who else who might — here’s how to participate: On JANUARY 19, 2013, at 2 p.m. Pacific, 3 p.m. Mountain, 4 p.m. Central, and 5 p.m. Eastern Standard Time, CALL 605-475-4000. You’ll be prompted to enter your participant access code: 204920#.

If you’re interested but can’t join us on 1/19, it’s not too late to be part of this effort. We’d love to hear from you, so please send a message to dancethesouthwest@gmail.com. Feel free to let us know your thoughts and interests, and we’ll share them with the planning group. Also we’ll be arranging follow-up calls and would be happy to include you.

Many thanks!

Linda (and Cora)

CDSS Sings!

by Caroline Batson, Promotion & Periodicals Director

CDSS staff singing, 12.5.12

As you may know, CDSS is joining in a regional e-philanthropy event next week on 12.12.12. We invite you to support our work with a special gift that day (or you can schedule a donation anytime between now and then). Since not everyone who’ll be giving that day knows what we do here at CDSS, we’re showing them. We’ll have a blog up tomorrow about an event last night, and on Monday we’ll be videotaping us doing the Abbots Bromley Horn dance for folks in our building. Check back again tomorrow and early next week to watch.

In the meanwhile, SING ALONG WITH US NOW! The words are — “You are welcome, you are welcome, you are welcome in this place.”

Video: Steve Howe. Singers, L to R: Mary Wesley, Robin Hayden, Linda Henry, Pat MacPherson, Nils Fredland, and Caroline Batson. Kathy Bullock led the song last summer at our Harmony of Music and Dance Week.

Okay, everyone ready? Sing!

Square Dance History Project Launches New Website

by David Millstone

A group of square dance enthusiasts has launched a digital library and website that takes a broad look at square dancing now as well as the historical antecedents of today’s squares. Please share this news and the link with others who might be interested!

The project’s primary focus is to collect good examples of moving images—more than 400 videos so far—that document square dancing in its many forms. This includes New England dosido and western docey-do, barn dances and hoedowns, stately quadrilles and rip-roarin’ squares of the 1950s, as well as modern square dance programs from Mainstream to Challenge. The site also includes interviews, text, photographs, audio files, and much more.

Among the many treats awaiting you:

• Rare footage of the Lloyd Shaw’s Cheyenne Mountain Dancers, plus a black and white silent film (1955) showing square dances in Central City, Colorado
• A set of 100 high-definition videos filmed in 2011 at the Dare To Be Square weekend at the John C. Campbell Folk School in Brasstown, NC, with six nationally-known square dance callers, and a set of 25 additional videotaped interviews.
• More than 150 items related to MWSD, including an article by Jim Mayo looking at the early years, illustrated with live recordings from the 1940s and 1950s
• Elizabeth Burchenal’s silent footage of southern Appalachian mountain squares from the early 1930s
• A curated assortment of more than 400 videos showing dancing from Newfoundland and Quebec to the American Southwest
• Exhibits showcasing items in the collection, on such diverse topics as the pioneering work of Lloyd Shaw in Colorado to an in-depth look at dances from Maryland Line, Maryland

The site is a work in progress, and additional material will be added regularly to the collection. The home page offers a way to contribute additional items; the organizers are especially interested in locating home movie footage from decades past.

As part of its financial contribution, CDSS co-sponsored the Dare To Be Square weekend and provided funding for the weekend’s documentation. This includes the videotaped dances plus the CD-ROM disk (syllabus and complete audio files) that is in the CDSS store. CDSS also administers the fund that supports the project; the other fiscal supporters include the Lloyd Shaw Foundation, CALLERLAB, and The ARTS (Alliance of Round, Traditional, and Square-Dance).

EFDSS and the Olympics

by Katy Spicer, Chief Executive, English Folk Dance and Song Society

Thanks to the good folks in London and Britain for putting on a splendid Olympic Games, and congratulations on all those medals. Here’s a story from our colleagues at EFDSS. Wish we’d been there! — Caroline

Sharp Morris, London Olympics, August 3, 2012

The Olympic Games provided some opportunities to showcase some great folk dance and music. Folk dance groups  performed at Olympic cultural events throughout England, and leading English folk musicians Eliza Carthy and Kathryn Tickell were both involved in the major BP River of Music project that comprised five music stages across London, each representing and featuring the music of one of the five continents. The English Folk Dance and Song Society (EFDSS) was involved in a number of events leading up to the start of the Games and provided advice and information to enable many other events to include folk music and dance.

Our events included the presentation of two new dance performances: ‘The Ballroom of Joys and Sorrows’ and ‘Must Come Down’. The former was a new dance, theatre and music show featuring a professional company of performers joined by a large number of community participants. This beautifully funny and poignant show created by choreographer Kate Flatt used traditional music, customs and dance to tell the story about a group of travelling players and featured folk musician Tim Van Eyken. ‘Must Come Down’ was an exuberant staged performance of morris dance and live music performed by Morris OffSpring, a company of young dancers aged between 15 and 25 years, supported by five musicians; the show was staged by Laurel Swift .

Camden Clog, London Olympics, August 3, 2012

The Torch Relay that saw the Olympic torch taken to nearly every corner of the British Isles proved a great opportunity for display dance teams to get involved. EFDSS was invited by Camden Council to stage a half hour performance of traditional dance as part of the events to herald the arrival of the Torch in Camden in North London, where the home of EFDSS, Cecil Sharp House, is based. Camden Clog and Sharp Morris were our representatives; both groups rehearse at Cecil Sharp House and have long associations with EFDSS. They flew the flag for English folk dancing brilliantly, performing in front of an enthusiastic crowd and on one of our rare sunny and rain free days!