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9:00-10:00

Advanced ECD: Elephants & Related Species – Andrew Shaw

Music by: Karen Axelrod, Audrey Knuth, Rachel Bell: This same class is presented twice to keep the numbers manageable; campers can attend one of the 2 sections. In the late 17th/early 18th century the English country dance reached the peak of its artistic development in terms of the refinement of the music, the ingenuity of the figure and the demands made upon the dancer. These classes will explore dances from the Henry Playford and later editions of The Dancing Master and the annual sets of Twenty Four New Country Dances for the Year published by John Walsh - and will include dances from Elephants Stairs.

ECD for All: Harmony in Motion – Robin Hayden

Music by: Chip Prince, Jon Berger: How do we move to English country dance music? How do we hold our bodies, gesture, connect, lilt, glide, or soar? What makes a dancer graceful, expressive, and musical? In keeping with this year's theme, we'll look at techniques for understanding and improving the way we move to English country dance music, in all its moods, rhythms, and styles. The program, while accessible to newer dancers, will offer distinct and satisfying challenges to any lifelong learner.

88-Finger Lilting – Jacqueline Schwab

Are you ready to take on the challenge of further developing your craft? Then Jacqueline's piano class, intended for English dance pianists actively playing in their communities, is for you! We will explore producing rhythmic, harmonic, and melodic support on piano or keyboard, in order to more easily command dancers to hear the phrasing, launch into the choreography, feel the lilting, forward flow of the style, lift their hearts and spirits, and have some fun!

10:15-11:15

ECD for All: Open Mic – Robin Hayden

Music by: Jacqueline Schwab, Corey Walters: Callers and dancers together form a network of mutual support for dance leaders of all levels of experience, including anyone wishing to step up to the mic for the first time. This is not a forum for trying out challenging or new-to-you-and-us repertoire: we will work towards the best possible presentation of dances we know well, aiming for a satisfying experience for all -- success for the caller, comfort for the musicians, joy for the dancers, and pride among assembled leaders at each other's accomplishments and growth. Callers will receive structured feedback in a supportive environment.

Sleights Longsword for All – Kalia Kliban

Music by: Jon Berger: This traditional longsword dance features a number of classic figures, as well as 6 different sword locks. It's a great opportunity for folks new to longsword to learn the basics, while more experienced dancers can experiment with modifications of the figures and staging.

ECD Band Workshop for All – Gene Murrow

Open to musicians interested in playing for English country dancing who have reasonable facility on one or more instruments (callers, beginning musicians, and others are welcome as auditors). The result of several years of development and presentation in England and the US, the workshop offers accommodation for both those who read music and those who play by ear; essential techniques for adding the "lift" necessary to inspire the dancers; basic understanding of the wide variety and history of English country dance music; useful techniques for playing in tune; and techniques for adding variety. Bring your instruments, a music stand, and a pencil, and be prepared for a week of great music-making.

11:25-12:00

Gathering – Kalia Kliban

Kalia will moderate this daily assembly where you can display your talents, or lack thereof, to the assembled multitudes. Dance demonstrations, mutant abilities, songs and stories, stupid human tricks, poetry and jokes, all are welcome. Sign up early, since the slots fill up fast!

1:45-2:45

Advanced ECD: Elephants & Related Species – Andrew Shaw

Music by: Jacqueline Schwab, Jon Berger, Anna Patton: This same class is presented twice to keep the numbers manageable; campers can attend one of the 2 sections. In the late 17th/early 18th century the English country dance reached the peak of its artistic development in terms of the refinement of the music, the ingenuity of the figure and the demands made upon the dancer. These classes will explore dances from the Henry Playford and later editions of The Dancing Master and the annual sets of Twenty Four New Country Dances for the Year published by John Walsh - and will include dances from Elephants Stairs.

ECD for All: Music Made Visible – Gene Murrow

Music by: Chip Prince, Corey Walters: George Balanchine, among others including Imogen Holst, noted that "dance is music made visible." The music of England's social/folk dance tradition is unusual in its embrace of a wide variety of musical forms and styles -- "duple" meter jigs, reels, hornpipes and marches; "triple" meter minuets, waltzes of several varieties, and slip jigs; and several eccentric forms. Set geometry and structure is equally varied. Sources and styles include Renaissance dance music, baroque theater music, classical-era sonatas, traditional songs, modern waltzes, and much more. We'll explore how the best choreographers have incorporated these disparate elements to make each visible and to enthrall the dancers.

The Joys of Playing (Violin) for English – Audrey Knuth

Playing for English country dance can be one of the most gratifying things - to watch the dancers move with our musical expression of each tune. During the course of the week, we'll dive deep in the creative and musical world that English tunes have to offer. In both group classes and individual lessons, we'll focus on what we can personally bring to the music by breaking down each tune and exploring the harmonic and solo possibilities. We'll also focus on our listening skills on being a supportive musician to both the dancers and to the other musicians around us. Feel free to contact me about specific tunes you would like us to concentrate on.

Play for Singing – Jeff Warner

The song comes first. We'll explore the message of the song, unaccompanied, before we decide how to enhance it with an instrument. I should be able to help you directly with banjo, guitar or English concertina-but any instrument is welcome. You might be a beginner or an experienced performer, but you should know your song (no reading texts) and know basic chords or scales. We'll help each other explore most effective ways to accompany.

3:00-4:00

Rip and Snort - Contras for all – Kalia Kliban

Music by: Karen Axelrod, Rob Rohr, Anna Patton: Come cut loose with a selection of contemporary and classic contras.

Favorites of the Boston Centre for Those Who Want to Know – Linda Nelson

Music by: Chip Prince, Audrey Knuth: Dances you know you want to know: the gems of our repertoire. Learn or refresh, be ready to enjoy each evening's "for those who know" selections. Beginners will learn the dance patterns, and more experienced dancers can fine tune for the subtleties which make these dances so beloved. Other classic and favorite dances will fill out the session as time permits.

Cotswold Morris for All – Crispin Youngberg

Music by: Corey Walters: Great Western Morris dance cotswold morris in the styles loosely derived from the villages of Leafield and Bampton. In this class Crispin (previously foreman of the team) will teach a mixture of the team's original dances in these styles, and variations on traditional dances. As well as teaching the dance steps, we'll work on performance style and audience engagement. All welcome, no previous morris experience required.

Music Theory for Dancers, Musicians, and Leaders – Gene Murrow

A multi-media presentation of the rudimentary elements of music theory as they apply to an appreciation of English country dance and music. The course assumes no knowledge of music whatsoever, but moves quickly to cover the basics of scales; keys (major, minor, modal); chords and simple harmony; music notation (you'll be able to read music by week's end); tempo, meter, and rhythm; and how it all combines to create the music we all love to dance to! The next time you hear something like "This next dance is a slip jig in 9/8 triple time, in D dorian mode, dotted quarter at about 106, two As and a B," you'll know exactly what it means!

Songs of the Atlantic Nation – Jeff Warner

Mostly singing-and a little history. We'll look at the great wealth of British songs that came to the New World: ballads, music hall, occupational songs. But we'll also pay attention to American songs that went to the UK, including sea shanties, minstrel songs and Tin Pan Alley hits. We'll also sing some English standards-like "Oh Good Ale"-that aren't found in the New World. Most have fine choruses, all have interesting stories.

4:30-5:30

ECD for All: Johnson, Thompson, & Co – Andrew Shaw

Music by: Karen Axelrod, Corey Walters: As the 18th century progressed and the demands of the ballroom changed, the English country dance underwent a marked transformation, becoming simpler and more standardised in form. The leading music publishers of the day, John Johnson, the Thompson family and the Rutherfords were joined by a host of smaller publishers all producing their annual sets and collected editions of dances into the early 19th century. They provide plenty of suitable material for the last class of the day.

Deliver the Rhythm! - Playing Dance Tunes with Oomph and Grace (For all instruments) – Anna Patton

This class is for dance musicians who want to work on the rhythmic aspects of their playing in a playful, exploratory way. There are so many different ways to play rhythmically: even sweeping legatos can be rhythmic. How can we create more rhythmic variation? How can a melody player find a niche in the rhythm section and vice versa? How to approach dragging or speeding tendencies? How to deliver the most satisfying kinds of oomph for different kinds of choreography? Rhythm-based improvisation!? Come explore these eternal questions and more.

Camphouse Song Swap – Jeff Warner

For generations, the Camphouse Porch has been the scene of excellent community sings at Pinewoods. Come add to the aura. Bring a chorus song to sing or just lend your voice to great traditional songs of the past, from the UK and North America. New songs welcome-as long as there is a chorus.

     
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